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Amazing Crazes February 2, 2016

Posted by Gareth in : Design & Technology, History, Various Subjects , add a comment

http://www.ool.co.uk/amazing-crazes/
Marbles, dinky toys, hula hoops, scoubidous, bang snaps, slime, spokey dokes and Tamagotchi… This Oxford Open Learning site looks back at over 50 years of toys that took classrooms and playgrounds by storm. The timeline runs up to the late 90s but students these days will no doubt find it fascinating to see not only what their parents were caught sneaking into school but also what toys have recently become popular once more.

Dunkeswell War Stories September 6, 2013

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.dunkeswellwarstories.com/
Dunkeswell War Stories is an interactive website developed in conjunction with staff and Key Stage 2 pupils at Broadhembury Primary School, close to Dunkeswell airfield in East Devon. Children can discover a collection of short films featuring twenty-six local people and four American veterans, combined with animation, photographs, music and 1940s-inspired artwork. There is a teacher’s area including printable resources and lesson plans for a six-week programme of learning about both film-making and the Second World War. It suggests how to knit the digital resource in with hands-on activities such as cooking on a ration.

The Jacobite Rebellions September 5, 2013

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.jacobites.org.uk/
Produced by Graham Gaw, a primary school teacher from Edinburgh, this interactive website will be of particular use in Scottish primary schools and can be explored using either PC/interactive whiteboard or iPads. The site features a timeline, detailed maps, a fun zone, information on key events & people and lots of other material connected to the topic of the Jacobite Rebellions.

Romans Revealed June 10, 2013

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.romansrevealed.com/
Romans Revealed has been produced by the Department of Archaeology at the University of Reading, in collaboration with the Runnymede Trust (an educational race equality charity) and children’s author Caroline Lawrence (author of The Roman Mysteries). The website provides a teaching resource for children to learn about diversity in Roman Britain, and is particularly aimed at Key Stage 2. Children can learn about life in Roman Britain through four individuals, and can explore them either through ‘excavating’ their graves or following short stories written by Caroline Lawrence. Through videos, they can also hear from the research team, and learn about the work archaeologists do. A teaching resource pack and activity sheets can be downloaded from the website, and used in the class-room or for home learning.

Ancient Mesopotamia September 26, 2012

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.zipang.org.uk/teachers/teachers.htm
The teachers’ section of The Enheduanna Society website contains a collection of resource pack useful for those who are studying the Ancient Mesopotamian Sumer or Assyrian Empires. As well as a map of the region, there are Smart Notebook presentations (and lesson plans) on areas such as food, cuneiform writing and mythology.

Famous People June 21, 2012

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/famouspeople/
The Famous People section on the BBC Primary History website features resources for over twenty personalities from history including John Logie Baird, Mary Queen of Scots, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Florence Nightingale as well as modern figures such as Sebastian Coe, Queen Elizabeth II, Tanni Grey-Thompson and Nelson Mandela.

BBC Doomsday Reloaded May 25, 2011

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/domesday
25 years ago the BBC and communities all across the UK were involved in an ambitious project to create a modern-day Doomsday Book. Stored on special Laser-Discs (a technology that never really caught on) and readable only by BBC Master microcomputers the data has been virtually inaccessible for years. The BBC have now produced a website to display a collection of the material and have launched a new project to produce entries to bring the archive up-to-date. There are suggestions of how schools and communities can get involved on this page of the site together as well as some activity packs connected to the project.

Me and My Community March 3, 2011

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.census.gov.uk/2011meandmycommunity
The Office for National Statistics has produced these resources for KS2 students designed to promote knowledge and understanding of the UK National Census (the next of which takes place on March 27th 2011). The site features material focusing on community (both today and in the past), resources to help children compare their lives with those living in Victorian times and information on the history of the census.

Grim Gruesome Viking Resources September 10, 2010

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.grimgruesome.com/
If you’re studying the Vikings with your class you might. want to check out the Grim Gruesome website. Grim Gruesome is a series of children’s fiction set during the Viking era. The website includes a collection of teaching resources that would still be useful even if you’re not using the books themselves. There’s also an interesting page full of Viking facts and activities.

A History of the World February 5, 2010

Posted by Gareth in : History , add a comment

http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/
This site, from the British Museum and the BBC, attempts to show the history of the world through the objects that humans have made. You can view the artefacts by navigating using a timeline or browse them by location, theme, culture, size, colour or material  The resource is linked to various BBC radio and television programmes, features objects from museums all over the country (as well as public contributions) and the site includes a collection of support material for  the primary school use.